Advertisements

How to generate detailed Oracle BI (OBIEE) Repository Documentation

In this post, I will show the steps for using the OBIEE “Repository Documentation” utility to generate repository (RPD) lineage information.  I will also provide a couple example of how this documentation (output file) can be used.

To access and run the Repository Documentation utility,  from the BI Admin Tool menu, select Tools -> Utilities.

biadmintool_menu_tools_utilities

From the Utilities dialog, select “Repository Documentation”, and click “Execute…”

utilitiesdialog

In the “Save As” dialog, select the destination and enter the name you would like for the output file.

saverepositorydocumentationdialog

When it finishes, it will generate the output csv file.  Note  – this will likely be a large file.  It will contain all your repository objects.

obieerepositoryoutputfile

The RPD documentation file will contain the following columns:
Subject Area, Presentation Table, Presentation Column, Description – Presentation Column, Business Model, Derived logical table, Derived logical column, Description – Derived Logical Column, Expression, Logical Table, Logical Column, Description – Logical Column, Logical Table Source, Expression, Initialization Block, Variable, Database, Physical Catalog, Physical Schema, Physical Table, Alias, Physical Column, Description – Physical Column

You can use this file to quickly track lineage from physical sources to the logical columns to the presentation columns and identify all the logic and variables in between.
You can also use it to identify where and how much a specified table, column, variable, etc. is used which will help you to identify dependencies and know the effect of making changes or deleting elements.

Development, Data Governance, and Quality Assurance teams may find this information useful in this format.

Advertisements

Creating a Custom Landing Page or Custom Home Page for your OBIEE / OBIA environment

Your organization may want to have a custom home page or landing page for your OBIEE or OBIA environment.  (I will use the term “Landing Page” going forward to not confuse it with the OBIEE delivered “Home Page”).  When users log in, they need to be automatically taken to this custom landing page instead of to the delivered OBIEE Home Page.

This post describes some of the reasons you may want a custom landing page, the content that could be on the page, how to automatically navigate users to the page, and security associated with the page.

Why would you want to create a Custom Landing Page?  The reasons will vary by organization, but these could be some of the reasons:

  1. Deliver the look and feel that your company or users desire.
  2. Allow for a place that serves as a central location for the content you want to emphasize, in the way you want to display it.
  3. Provide a central place for messages of any kind for your users.

What content will be on this Custom Landing Page?  Some of the possibilities are:

  1. Create a page with your custom logos, images, and colors that are in line with your company’s or department’s branding.
  2. A section with messages for your user community. This information could include things such as:
    1. The date/time of the last data load?
    2. The sources of the information displayed on your dashboards
    3. Information about recent dashboard releases
    4. Upcoming downtime
    5. Upcoming events such as user training events
    6. Action needed by the user community
  3. A section that lists links to useful resources, such as:
    1. user’s guides or tutorials
    2. dashboard and report glossary
    3. analysis/report request forms
    4. Security/Access Request forms
    5. general OBI information
  4. A section with Contact Information – containing information about who, what, when, how to contact people for help or information, or how to submit new requests for data/analyses/reports, maybe by functional area, etc.
  5. An area to display your company’s or division’s top key performance indicators (KPIs). These should be limited to just a few – I would say not more than 5 – and they should be relevant company-wide or “OBI user community-wide”.
  6. Links to dashboards. You may create an area or areas of links to various dashboards. Your dashboard list may include many of your dashboards or just a select few that you know are frequently used or that you want to emphasize.

All users that are authorized to use the OBI system will have access to this page.  So, maybe BI Consumer role will be provided access.

However, you will need to set security on the sections containing links to dashboards to allow access only to those authorized for the each set of dashboards.

Once your custom landing page is ready, you will then need to set it as the default page for users (or a subset of users).  To do this you will need to create an initialization block that sets the PORTALPATH built-in OBI variable to point to the new landing page dashboard page.

One final note … you can have multiple custom landing pages if you desire, for example, a different page for each division or a different page for each major group of users.  You would then need to set the PORTALPATH variable based on the user’s profile.

Good luck with your custom landing page project.

Disallow online RPD updates in OBIEE

You may want to disable online updates on your OBIEE RPD for performance reasons or because you have a specific development process that prohibits online updates.

To disallow online RPD updates, do the following:
Log into Enterprise Manager. Navigate the tree menu to Business Intelligence -> coreapplication.  Click tabs “Capacity Management”, and “Performance”.

Under the RPD Updates section, check the box for “Disallow RPD updates”.

disallowRPD_updates

This will prevent online RPD updates for all.

If you want to allow a select group of people to have access to perform online updates, such as a lead developer or administrator, then don’t do the above, but instead provide Administrator role to those that should have the access, and remove it from those that should not (and give them BI Author role for example instead).

 

OBIEE Performance Tuning

This post describes a few tips and things to keep in mind for OBIEE Performance Tuning.

Be Proactive when possible
The need to performance tune can be proactive (tune before a major issue arises) or reactive (tune after a problem is reported by users for example).  It is best to be proactive – so performance tuning should be built into your OBIEE maintenance schedule. For example, OBIEE’s Usage Tracking functionality should be used regularly to identify reports whose performance can be improved and then performance steps should be carried out on the worst performers.

Iterative Process – change one thing or set of things at a time
One of the first things to keep in mind is that performance tuning is an iterative process.  And there is typically no one silver bullet that will resolve all your performance problems.  You may need to analyze and make changes to multiple parts of the system, but you want to make the changes methodically.  It is best to change one parameter or setting at the same time (or one related set of parameters).  Adjust and test the settings for that one parameter/setting (or set of parameters) before moving on to another.  If you change too much at one time, you may have a difficulty determining what is helping from what is hurting your efforts.

Fix user complaints first, worst performers next, and then the next bad performers down the list
Another thing to keep in mind, tune what users are reporting first, then tune the worst problems second, then move on to the next.

Team Effort – problem could be anywhere along the technology stack
Performance problems could be anywhere along the technology stack:
• OBIEE
• Database
• Server
• Network
Due to that span of technology, performance tuning is a team effort.  OBIEE Admins and Developers, DBAs, and ETL Developers can all be key to solving performance issues.
Logs from all components may need to be reviewed depending on the scenario.

Try to isolate or narrow-down the source of the problem
For example, run the report SQL directly on the database and see if you have the same problem. If there is no issue when run directly on that the database, then you have eliminated the database as the problem.
Determine if other applications have been also been experiencing slowness which could indicate the possibility of a network problem.

If your users have reported an issue, then you need to get as much details as possible about the performance problems they are experiencing.  When did this start happening?  Is it just one report or many?  Is it localized to one business area or multiple?  Is it all the time or sometimes?  Knowing this will help you to know where to focus.

Other questions to ask as you try to identify the source of the problem include but not limited to:
Has anything changed?  If reports were running fine, but are now slow, the first thing to ask is …
When the issue start?  Determining exactly when it started might be helpful when correlating with other system or company activity)
What has changed recently?  Has there been any system changes, data changes, database updates, network changes, etc. (even if they seem unrelated)?  For example, rolling into a new calendar year will cause new “Year” value(s) to be included in the data and can impact performance if statistics are not gathered.
Is there a possibility that an index was dropped and not recreated as expected?

Use OBIEE’s Usage Tracking information to analyze specific reports, analyze long running reports, or frequently run reports.  You will want to capture and analyze the SQL from these reports to determine what can be done to improve their performance.

Database
DBAs can monitor the system in real-time, use various tools, or review logs for information that can be helpful in the tuning effort.  Tools such as Oracle Enterprise Manager (EM) or SQL Tuning Advisor can be used to identify, analyze and tune high-load SQL.
OBIEE Usage Tracking can also be used to identify high-load SQL.
Without getting into much detail, these are some database features that could be used to help improve performance:
• Gather Statistics
• Results Cache database feature
• Partitioning

Servers
The System Admins can monitor the server resources to determine if there is an issue there.
• Use fast disk for the OBIEE cache and/or temporary files.

 

OBIEE-specific performance tuning tips

• OBIEE Caching
Are the tables being used set to cacheable?
Is caching turned on at the application level?
You may consider seeding the cache daily.
CACHE Settings:
o MAX_ROWS_PER_CACHE_ENTRY
o MAX_CACHE_ENTRY_SIZE
o MAX_CACHE_ENTRIES
o ——————-
o USE_ADVANCED_HIT_DETECTION

• Use Aggregation: Aggregate data when applicable
o You can use Aggregate tables or materialized views to realize this benefit.
o Aggregate Fact tables and corresponding Aggregate Dimensions.
o Make sure aggregation rules are applied to Fact table measures.
o Don’t necessarily merge all measures into a single fact.

• Joins and Indexes
o Do not create unnecessary joins.
o Verify that the joins on the tables being investigated are appropriate.
o Performance Indexing could be helpful.  Again, this is an iterative process.

• Prompts and Filters
o Use LOV tables to drive prompt values when possible, instead of building prompts from large transactional data tables.
o Force filter selection / entry by making prompt values required.  Do not allow open ended run of reports.

• Filter out unneeded data.  If there is a significant amount of data that is not being used in one or more tables (especially if they are frequently used), then that data should be filtered out by the ETL before it gets joined in SQL, and then has to be filtered out in the RPD or at the report level.

• Enter the “Number of Elements at this level” value in the logical level in hierarchies.
• Also ensure that all logical level keys are unique.

• Avoid function in the where clause when possible.

• Be careful of sub-queries.

• Check out the features of the OBIEE Performance Monitor
http://server:port/analytics/saw.dll?Perfmon  (enter your OBI server and port)

• When possible, do comparison analysis to determine for example, why is this report running fine, but this other seemingly similar report is not.

• Use fast disk for the OBIEE cache and/or temporary files.

Sometimes a complete overhaul might be required
Review the users’ workflow and determine if new and improved queries can be written or if the number of queries can be reduced.
Present information from a summary level first, and then provide increasing levels of details as requested by users through drill down or navigation.  Basically, present detailed information only when necessary, and minimize the amount of detail provided at a time by filtering on user selections.

Oracle’s OBIEE Performance Tuning Guide
Apply recommendations from the “Best Practices Guide for Infrastructure Tuning Oracle® Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition 11g Release”.  I would recommend applying 1 – 3 changes or set of changes at a time; don’t apply everything at the same time because if there is a problem, it will be more difficult to determine which change caused it.
https://blogs.oracle.com/proactivesupportEPM/entry/wp_obiee_tuning_guide

“The connection has failed” Error when trying to Import Metadata into OBIEE

If you get the error “The connection has failed” when you try to Import Metadata into the RPD, this post may help you to resolve it.

The solution is to: Create an Environment Variable called TNS_ADMIN and set its value to the directory of your tnsnames.ora file.
The TNS_ADMIN variable tells Oracle Client where to find the tnsnames.ora file which contains your data source details.

In case you need the details:
Click the Windows Start menu –> Right-Click on Computer –> select Properties
Then click on “Advanced system settings” on the left.
Advanced_System_Settings

Click the “Environment Variables” button.
Then in the Environment Variables window, click New.
Enter the details for the TNS_ADMIN variable.  The value needs to be the path to your tnsnames.ora file, typically located at [ORACLE_HOME]\network\admin. The path will look something like the value shown below (it depends on where Oracle is installed on your system).
TNS_ADMIN_Environment_Variable

 Hope this helps.

WebLogic startup failure – BackendRoot cannot cast to BackendStandard

My colleague from a previous company contacted me recently to help with a problem. OBIEE was not starting up.  They had a power failure the night before, and then OBIEE would not start up.  The system is OBIEE 11g on Linux.

This is the error that was generated when trying to start the WebLogic Admin Server…

——-

<Mar 28, 2014 9:11:35 AM EDT> <Critical> <WebLogicServer> <BEA-000362> <Server failed. Reason: There are 1 nested errors: java.lang.ClassCastException: com.octetstring.vde.backend.BackendRoot cannot be cast to com.octetstring.vde.backend.standard.BackendStandard         at weblogic.ldap.EmbeddedLDAP.start(EmbeddedLDAP.java:303)         at weblogic.t3.srvr.SubsystemRequest.run(SubsystemRequest.java:64)         at weblogic.work.ExecuteThread.execute(ExecuteThread.java:209)         at weblogic.work.ExecuteThread.run(ExecuteThread.java:178) > < Mar 28, 2014 9:11:35 AM EDT> <Notice> <WebLogicServer> <BEA-000365> <Server state changed to FAILED> < Mar 28, 2014 9:11:35 AM EDT> <Error> <WebLogicServer> <BEA-000383> <A critical service failed. The server will shut itself down> < Mar 28, 2014 9:11:35 AM EDT> <Notice> <WebLogicServer> <BEA-000365> <Server state changed to FORCE_SHUTTING_DOWN>

——– 

After trying a few things that did not resolve the issue, an online search helped with the solution. This post was very helpful: https://community.oracle.com/thread/2285489?tstart=0

After reading through the post, we went to the below directory on the OBIEE server (Linux) and examined its contents:

$MIDDLEWARE_HOME/user_projects/domains/bifoundation_domain/servers/AdminServer/data/ldap/ldapfiles

[oracle@[SERVERNAME]]$ cd /u01/product/middleware/user_projects/domains/bifoundation_domain/servers/AdminServer/data/ldap/ldapfiles [oracle@aeledwpbi ldapfiles]$ ls -l total 11308

-rw-r—– 1 oracle oinstall 10071624 Mar 27 08:40 changelog.data
-rw-r—– 1 oracle oinstall    56940 Mar 27 08:40 changelog.index
-rw-r—– 1 oracle oinstall   804359 Mar 27 08:40 EmbeddedLDAP.data
-rw-r—– 1 oracle oinstall     2028 Jun 25  2013 EmbeddedLDAP.delete
-rw-r—– 1 oracle oinstall     3576 Jun 25  2013 EmbeddedLDAP.index
-rw-r—– 1 oracle oinstall        0 Mar 28 12:36 EmbeddedLDAP.lok
-rw-r—– 1 root   root       615242 Mar 27 08:40 EmbeddedLDAP.tran
-rw-r—– 1 oracle oinstall        8 Mar 27 08:40 EmbeddedLDAP.trpos
-rw-r—– 1 oracle oinstall        8 Mar 27 08:40 EmbeddedLDAP.twpos

Note how one of the files (EmbeddedLDAP.tran) is owned by “root”. It seems the power outage caused something unusual to happen resulting in “root” being assigned ownership of the file.

After having the system administrator change the owner from “root” to “oracle” (the OBIEE admin user), we were able to start the OBIEE system back up.

New OBIEE Tuning Guide (Version 4) – released Jan 2014

A new version of the OBIEE Tuning Guide (Version 4) was released in January, 2014.  It is suitable for OBIEE 11.1.1.6 and 11.1.1.7 versions.

It can be found on Oracle Support under Document ID 1333049.1.   Or here is a direct link to the document (PDF).

—————————————-

New highlights from the previous document include:

  •     Optimized JVM switches for JRockit / Sun JVM / IBM JVM
  •     New tuning parameters settings / values for JavaHost / OPIS / OBIS components.
  •     Improved performance monitoring techniques.
  •     IBM WebSphere tuning parameters.
  •     More WebLogic Server tuning parameters.
  •     Windows Server 2012 tuning parameter.
  •     New optimized Linux / AIX tuning parameters.
  •     Additional Essbase ASO tuning parameters.
  •     libOVD authenticator search tuning

—————————————-

As always, this document provides us with recommended baselines or starting points, but the appropriate settings for each environment will vary.