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OBIEE Performance Tuning

This post describes a few tips and things to keep in mind for OBIEE Performance Tuning.

Be Proactive when possible
The need to performance tune can be proactive (tune before a major issue arises) or reactive (tune after a problem is reported by users for example).  It is best to be proactive – so performance tuning should be built into your OBIEE maintenance schedule. For example, OBIEE’s Usage Tracking functionality should be used regularly to identify reports whose performance can be improved and then performance steps should be carried out on the worst performers.

Iterative Process – change one thing or set of things at a time
One of the first things to keep in mind is that performance tuning is an iterative process.  And there is typically no one silver bullet that will resolve all your performance problems.  You may need to analyze and make changes to multiple parts of the system, but you want to make the changes methodically.  It is best to change one parameter or setting at the same time (or one related set of parameters).  Adjust and test the settings for that one parameter/setting (or set of parameters) before moving on to another.  If you change too much at one time, you may have a difficulty determining what is helping from what is hurting your efforts.

Fix user complaints first, worst performers next, and then the next bad performers down the list
Another thing to keep in mind, tune what users are reporting first, then tune the worst problems second, then move on to the next.

Team Effort – problem could be anywhere along the technology stack
Performance problems could be anywhere along the technology stack:
• OBIEE
• Database
• Server
• Network
Due to that span of technology, performance tuning is a team effort.  OBIEE Admins and Developers, DBAs, and ETL Developers can all be key to solving performance issues.
Logs from all components may need to be reviewed depending on the scenario.

Try to isolate or narrow-down the source of the problem
For example, run the report SQL directly on the database and see if you have the same problem. If there is no issue when run directly on that the database, then you have eliminated the database as the problem.
Determine if other applications have been also been experiencing slowness which could indicate the possibility of a network problem.

If your users have reported an issue, then you need to get as much details as possible about the performance problems they are experiencing.  When did this start happening?  Is it just one report or many?  Is it localized to one business area or multiple?  Is it all the time or sometimes?  Knowing this will help you to know where to focus.

Other questions to ask as you try to identify the source of the problem include but not limited to:
Has anything changed?  If reports were running fine, but are now slow, the first thing to ask is …
When the issue start?  Determining exactly when it started might be helpful when correlating with other system or company activity)
What has changed recently?  Has there been any system changes, data changes, database updates, network changes, etc. (even if they seem unrelated)?  For example, rolling into a new calendar year will cause new “Year” value(s) to be included in the data and can impact performance if statistics are not gathered.
Is there a possibility that an index was dropped and not recreated as expected?

Use OBIEE’s Usage Tracking information to analyze specific reports, analyze long running reports, or frequently run reports.  You will want to capture and analyze the SQL from these reports to determine what can be done to improve their performance.

Database
DBAs can monitor the system in real-time, use various tools, or review logs for information that can be helpful in the tuning effort.  Tools such as Oracle Enterprise Manager (EM) or SQL Tuning Advisor can be used to identify, analyze and tune high-load SQL.
OBIEE Usage Tracking can also be used to identify high-load SQL.
Without getting into much detail, these are some database features that could be used to help improve performance:
• Gather Statistics
• Results Cache database feature
• Partitioning

Servers
The System Admins can monitor the server resources to determine if there is an issue there.
• Use fast disk for the OBIEE cache and/or temporary files.

 

OBIEE-specific performance tuning tips

• OBIEE Caching
Are the tables being used set to cacheable?
Is caching turned on at the application level?
You may consider seeding the cache daily.
CACHE Settings:
o MAX_ROWS_PER_CACHE_ENTRY
o MAX_CACHE_ENTRY_SIZE
o MAX_CACHE_ENTRIES
o ——————-
o USE_ADVANCED_HIT_DETECTION

• Use Aggregation: Aggregate data when applicable
o You can use Aggregate tables or materialized views to realize this benefit.
o Aggregate Fact tables and corresponding Aggregate Dimensions.
o Make sure aggregation rules are applied to Fact table measures.
o Don’t necessarily merge all measures into a single fact.

• Joins and Indexes
o Do not create unnecessary joins.
o Verify that the joins on the tables being investigated are appropriate.
o Performance Indexing could be helpful.  Again, this is an iterative process.

• Prompts and Filters
o Use LOV tables to drive prompt values when possible, instead of building prompts from large transactional data tables.
o Force filter selection / entry by making prompt values required.  Do not allow open ended run of reports.

• Filter out unneeded data.  If there is a significant amount of data that is not being used in one or more tables (especially if they are frequently used), then that data should be filtered out by the ETL before it gets joined in SQL, and then has to be filtered out in the RPD or at the report level.

• Enter the “Number of Elements at this level” value in the logical level in hierarchies.
• Also ensure that all logical level keys are unique.

• Avoid function in the where clause when possible.

• Be careful of sub-queries.

• Check out the features of the OBIEE Performance Monitor
http://server:port/analytics/saw.dll?Perfmon  (enter your OBI server and port)

• When possible, do comparison analysis to determine for example, why is this report running fine, but this other seemingly similar report is not.

• Use fast disk for the OBIEE cache and/or temporary files.

Sometimes a complete overhaul might be required
Review the users’ workflow and determine if new and improved queries can be written or if the number of queries can be reduced.
Present information from a summary level first, and then provide increasing levels of details as requested by users through drill down or navigation.  Basically, present detailed information only when necessary, and minimize the amount of detail provided at a time by filtering on user selections.

Oracle’s OBIEE Performance Tuning Guide
Apply recommendations from the “Best Practices Guide for Infrastructure Tuning Oracle® Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition 11g Release”.  I would recommend applying 1 – 3 changes or set of changes at a time; don’t apply everything at the same time because if there is a problem, it will be more difficult to determine which change caused it.
https://blogs.oracle.com/proactivesupportEPM/entry/wp_obiee_tuning_guide

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“The connection has failed” Error when trying to Import Metadata into OBIEE

If you get the error “The connection has failed” when you try to Import Metadata into the RPD, this post may help you to resolve it.

The solution is to: Create an Environment Variable called TNS_ADMIN and set its value to the directory of your tnsnames.ora file.
The TNS_ADMIN variable tells Oracle Client where to find the tnsnames.ora file which contains your data source details.

In case you need the details:
Click the Windows Start menu –> Right-Click on Computer –> select Properties
Then click on “Advanced system settings” on the left.
Advanced_System_Settings

Click the “Environment Variables” button.
Then in the Environment Variables window, click New.
Enter the details for the TNS_ADMIN variable.  The value needs to be the path to your tnsnames.ora file, typically located at [ORACLE_HOME]\network\admin. The path will look something like the value shown below (it depends on where Oracle is installed on your system).
TNS_ADMIN_Environment_Variable

 Hope this helps.

It’s all about the users – Identifying Users for your OBIEE application

One of the first things you will need to do before developing your Oracle Business Intelligence (OBIEE) application is … identify who will use it.  You need to identify who will be using the application – what business areas they belong to, what groups they belong to, what are the various functions or roles within those groups, and eventually, who are the actual people.  After identifying the various roles (groups of users typically associated with a business process or function), then you can identify their needs.  Starting any development before knowing who will be using the system could result in a lot of wasted time and effort or a sub-optimal system.  The grouping of information on dashboards, the available functionality and security will be driven by these roles and their respective needs.

After identifying the various functions or roles that users posses, then it is important to understand how each role performs their job functions.  You need to understand what information they need and in what order, how it’s used, and the level of detail required at various stages. With this information, you will determine the dashboards, dashboard pages and their order, the information on each dashboard page and its precedence and level of detail, and what detailed information is needed via drill down. Basically, you will be creating the analytic workflows for the identified roles and the various processes, functions and tasks that they perform.

When performing the above exercise, please be as discrete as possible.  For example, even if someone doubles as an AP/AR Analyst, you should still analyze and plan for 2 separate roles – AP Analyst and AR Analyst – because those are 2 separate functions.  Later, the individual or group can be granted permissions to both roles.  From a security standpoint in general, you will create the necessary OBIEE application roles to support your business roles.  And then assign security based on these roles.

In general, always keep the focus on the users, what they need to accomplish, and the most efficient ways to help them perform their job.  When you build the OBI system to meet those needs and usage scenarios, it will result in higher and faster user adoption.  This will take time, so do not rush the process.  Get detailed information about all the steps in their workflow upfront, document it, and then build around it.  However, on the other hand, you do not have to document to perfection upfront, you can take a more agile approach of developing based on fairly good user profiles to give users working prototypes, and then adjusting as new information and feedback is received from the users.

Good luck identifying your users and their needs as you get your OBIEE project rolling.  And remember, it’s all about the users!

How to conditionally set Interaction (Action Links) on a column in OBIEE 11g

This post shows an example of how to conditionally set Interaction (Action Links) on a column.

Most times, when you set “Interaction” on a column, you set it for the column under all conditions – this is the default.  However, it is possible to conditionally set “Interaction” on a column – so that the Interaction link is conditionally available.

Let’s look at an example …

You have a pivot table displaying Values by day range as shown below.  Interaction is set on the measure value, and therefore, a user can click on any of the measure values (in any column and any row) to drill/navigate to a more detailed report for example. 

(Note that all the measure values are “blue” indicating that they are hyperlinks allowing navigation to some other BI content).
1-Pivot_with_Interaction_Set_On_Measure_Value

Let’s now assume that you only want to make the Interaction available for the measure values associated with “Value A”.  Therefore, the row in your pivot table associated with “Value A” will have measure values that are clickable (hyperlinks), while the “Value B” row values will not.  In other words, you only want to allow drill down/navigation on “Value A” data.

To do this, from your analysis, edit the column properties, and go to the Interaction tab, and Edit the relevant Action Link.

3-Edit_Action_Link

Change the “Show Link” property from “Always” to “Conditionally”.

4-Show_Link_Conditionally

Then enter the condition(s) in the Conditions box. Such as in our example, we want to show/activate the action link only for “Value A” values.  So, choose the column, and then select “Value A” (and of course, do not select “Value B”).

5-Select_Value_for_Action_LInk

Now when you go back to your report, action links will only be available on the measure values for “Value A” row.

(Note that only the measure values associated with “Value A” are “blue” indicating that they are hyperlinks allowing navigation to some other BI content; while “Value B” values are black indicating that they are not clickable.)
6-After_Setting_Conditionally

You can add more conditions and more complex conditions as necessary. One thought that came to mind … I could even see this being used to conditionally set Action Links based on users – allowing some users to be able to click the action links while others just see the data without being able to click and navigate to other detail.

Changing the maximum number of values in a drop down list in OBIEE 11g – MaxDropDownValues

When you create a prompt that uses a drop down list in OBIEE, the drop down list is limited to 256 values by default.  If your list contains more values and you would like to see more values without having to click the “More” button, or if you would like to show less values, there is a configuration parameter that you can change to increase the number of values shown up to 1000.  You can set it to any value up to 1000, including values less than the default of 256.

To do this, edit the instanceconfig.xml file.  This file is located at …
[$FMW_HOME]/instances/instance1/config/OracleBIPresentationServicesComponent/coreapplication_obips1

Add the MaxDropDownValues parameter to the file.  If you do not already have a Prompts section, add it, and then add MaxDropDownValues between the Prompts tags.  And make sure that all this is between the ServerInstance tags which will already be there in the file.

Your config file will look something like this …

<ServerInstance>


    <Prompts>
        <MaxDropDownValues>1000</MaxDropDownValues> 
    </Prompts>

</ServerInstance>

Setting_MaxDropDownValues_InstanceConfig

After making these changes, you will need to restart BI Presentation Services for them to take effect. Then your drop down list will show up to 1000 (or less) values by default…

DropDownList_ShowingMax

Note: The numbers shown in the screenshot have no meaning whatsoever; they are just randomly generated sample data for example purposes. So, any similarity that they may have to any other number is strictly coincidental.

Weird prompt values in dashboard prompts after upgrade

Have you noticed weird prompt values in your reports after upgrading OBIEE from 10g to 11g?  Below is an example of what you might see …

Weird_Prompt_Values

This is usually caused by calculated columns in the report.  You will need to remove those columns, and then add them back to the report.  And then, depending on what your calculated columns were being used for, you may want to consider using Selection Steps instead to accomplish the same logic.

If you know of another way to fix this scenario, please share.

Creating a new Security Realm in OBIEE 11g

When setting up security in OBIEE 11g, you may modify the default security realm (myrealm) that installs with OBIEE.   But even better, you may create a new security realm and leave the default realm untouched.

My preference is to leave the default realm untouched and create a new realm – this is a best practice in my opinion.  I think it is helpful to always be able to go back and look at the features and settings of the default security realm.  And you can name your new security realm more appropriately, such as, ABCIncSecurityRealm.

The link below (Paul Cannon’s Blog) brings you to a blog post about configuring OBIEE to use LDAP authentication, and the first part of the post covers creating the new security realm.  It is very detailed. I used it the first time I created a new security realm.

http://paulcannon-bi.blogspot.com/2012/07/configuring-ldap-authentication-for.html

Good luck creating your new security realm.